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20121128
20121128
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
'll debate it. and the protests in cairo, the white house refuses to condemn the egyptian president's dictator-like grab. all of that, and a "hannity" shootout with juan williams and more. "hannity" starts right now. tonight as the fiscal cliff drama unfolds on capitol hill, we'll take a step back and look at how we got to this point. namely, how do we become a nation buried under more than $16 trillion debt, why crippling defense cuts, and the largest tax increase will take hold in 35 days because your elected officials don't know how to stop spending money. let me first play a small part of one of the most memorable inaugural addresses of all time. >> my fellow americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. >> sean: sadly five decades removed from that iconic speech, the democratic party, its leaders, and countless other americans, rely on government for too many things. instead of asking what they can do for their country, they're asking what their country can do for them. now the debt record is at record levels, tax rates are soaring,
. they clashed with police again in the streets of cairo. the protests began last week after morsi issued a decree last thursday giving himself near absolute power. nbc's jim maceda joins us live from cairo and may be movement of new constitution? >> reporter: right. well, you have got this whole -- this is really basically a constitutional crisis from the beginning. you know, tamron pitting morsi against the judiciary so we're going to see it playing out in the courts and the streets but what happened today was that egypt's highest appeals court known as the court of casation said to suspend the work and effectively going on strike. but and it would stay on strike it's saying until morsi cancels his controversial decree giving as you say absolute power, almost absolute power. now that court joined by a number of lower appeals courts today, as well. and the level of criticism from the judges, tamron, really unprecedented. they said that morsi's decree, quote, defies belief. many other judges and lawyers and journalists have now got on didn't bandwagon and striking. so far, morsi is defian
. >> unbelievable. more than 100,000 people flooded into downtown cairo. this time they are protesting the current president martha maccallum and his power grab. they are disillusioned with what he has brought to their country. then you have this happening. police firing teargas. gypt's highest courts refusing to work in protest of morsi's actions. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. the protests looked like the unrest we saw in that same square back in 2009 and the arab spring and the overthrow of mubarak. how dangerous is it? is it more dangerous now? >> this certainly allows similarities between what we saw last night and those demonstrations that overthrew mubarak. hundreds of thousands of people are energized. many of them want this president out. but a couple of important differences. the current president martha maccallum was elected by 52% of the vote just five months ap a - the current president mohamed morsi haas elected by 52% of the vote. martha: it was a close election and the other choice may have been a more democratic choice. people were searching for new leadership and th
harrigan is live in cairo with the very latest, steve. >> those protestors are out again for the 6th night in a row at tahrir square scuffling with police. we've seen exchanges of rocks and teargas on both sides, several protestors coming away injured, police injured as well. nowhere near the numbers we saw last night where as many as 200,000 demonstrators were in the square. they are demanding not only that the president pull back on his decrease but the entire government gets toppled. judges from two of the courts including the appeals court has gone on strike. they say they are not going to work again until the president takes a step back. we are seeing no comprises from president mohammed morsi. in fact we are hearing from his supporters in the muslim brotherhood that they plan on staging major marchs across the nation on saturday in support of mohammed morsi. they have kept their distance perhaps trying to reduce of conflict between two sides. megyn: steve harrigan thank you. new safety measures being put in place to protect the world from a dangerous historic site. trace takes a look
, but it's in many of the papers this morning, angry protesters filling tahrir square in cairo. they're stepping up pressure for their president to rescind a decree that they say threaten the nation with a new era of autocracy. there's the picture on the front page of the washington times. we will be talking about this on sunday on the washington journal. back to the phone calls. john in san jose, california, independent. caller: thanks so much for having me. good morning. i have a really good friend who's a teacher at a high school we attended when we were in high school. one of the things she complains about the most is just how rigid the system is. really, i think it's ironic that we continue to say teachers are important, although teachers for the most part are not in charge of their own profession. the system should be a little bit more organic in the sense that if a teacher has a great idea she can rally real talent her or him. the other of thing i wanted to share is there's a whole system within the system that provides individualized education plans to students who have speci
the shootdown as a turning point in the country's ongoing and deadly civil war. >>> in egypt, cairo's tahrir square is a tinderbox as protests against president morsi continue to grow. more than 200,000 people jammed the square to demonstrate against morsi's brazen power grab. tensions are growing across egypt, and alex marquadt reports now from cairo. >> reporter: the birthplace of egypt's revolution once again ringing with calls for the downfall of a dictator. this time it's for this man, president mohamed morsi, whom america relies on to be a regional peace broker. last week he granted himself unchecked power, leading to today's bloody clashes. the crowd is chanting the same chants we heard two years ago during the revolution, except that they have substituted mubarak for morsi. egyptians toppled president hosni mubarak, a dictator who ruled for three decades. they then held a historic election, voted in the new president, and now -- >> he's like a pharoah. >> reporter: morsi's office says the move is just temporary, to sideline remnants of the mubarak era and put egypt on the right track
and protesters scuffled near cairo's tahrir square with arrests of young people many still upset by president mohamed morsi's move to consolidate his power. the muslim brotherhood is supporting nationwide rallies to support the president. the new constitution meantime says it has almost finished its final draft. and the e.p.a. is temporarily banning bp from competing for new government contracts. in the wake of the 2010 gulf oil spill, the agency says it is taking action because of bp's "lack of business integrity." as of february bp had $9 billion in contracts with the feds. bp it expects this ban to be lifted shortly. and the manager who oversaw apple's flawed maps program on its new iphone has been fired. rich williamson was fired just before the thanksgiving holiday. he had been with apple for about a decade. the flawed maps app forced ceo tim cook to issue a public apology after the iphone's debut in september. and if you've ever dreamed of an intimate dinner with betty white, well here is your chance. a los angeles chapter of the society for the prevention of cruel tito animals is aucti
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)